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Michelle DelMar, Esq.

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Attorney Michelle DelMar

Focusing on Business, the Whole Business and

Nothing but the Business.

Trademark Attorney, Contract Attorney, Corporation Attorney

Michelle DelMar, Esq., Trademark Attorney, Contract Attorney, Corporation Attorney

 
 
Michelle DelMar, Esq.
 
Small Business Lawyer, Trademark Attorney and Executive Contract Lawyer.
 
Martindale-Hubbell®
Client Review Rating: “Preeminent” (5 out of 5)
 Peer Review Rating:  4.7 out of 5
 
Michelle DelMar, Legal Strategist for Top Growing Businesses, provides information,  guidance and services for small businesses:
 

Taking small businesses From Startup:

to Operation:

and Exit, Sale or Transfer:
 
 

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Legal Info for Businesses

Business Checklists

Understanding Agreements

Want to Discuss your Business Issues? Click here to speak to Michelle Grenier and/or schedule a consultation.

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Michelle DelMar, Esq.

Business Lawyer, Trademark Lawyer and Executive Contract Lawyer

Michelle L. DelMar, Esq.

Michelle L. DelMar, Esq.
Michelle DelMar, Esq., formerly, Michelle Grenier, represents businesses and executives concerning contracts, corporations and trademarks and more. Unique aspects of Michelle's practice include International Business Contracts, Corporations and Subsidiaries and Trademark Registration.
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Recent Posts

International Business Lawyers Connection

Posted by Michelle L. DelMar, Esq. Apr 5, 2017 1:11:34 AM
international flags globe world

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS LAWYERS CONNECTION

The International Business Lawyers Connection can help you execute your international business plans, including:

  • starting a business in the United States
  • start a business abroad
  • expand your business into the United States
  • expanding your business abroad
  • setting up a subsidiary in the United States
  • setting up a subsidiary abroad
  • protecting your intellectual property locally or internationally
  • Registering your Trademark locally or internationally
  • protecting your intellectual property and other assets with proper contracts or agreements

Tags: International Business Law

Understanding the Letter of Credit

Posted by Michelle L. DelMar, Esq. Jan 19, 2016 1:28:00 PM

Understanding the Letter of Credit

     One of the biggest risks in using a Letter of Credit, is not fully understanding the terms.  Clarification can be obtained easily, with proper counsel.

Tags: Strategies from Small Business Lawyer and Trademar, Contracts, Corporations and LLC'S What Business Owners Should, Understanding the Letter of Credit, What are Trademarks

Understanding Business Agreements for Small Businesses and Executives

Posted by Michelle L. DelMar, Esq. Jan 19, 2016 1:24:18 PM

Contract Image

 

 

Understanding Business Agreements for Small Businesses and Executives

Experienced Business Lawyer, Michelle DelMar, helps businesses protect their investment, with a variety of contracts, agreements, advice and representation.  Attorney DelMar will provide you with a Free Consultation, with suggestions and recommendations related to your business goals and corresponding legal issues.  Following the consultation, you will receive a free summary of issues with recommendations.

 

Tags: Understanding Business Agreements for Small Busine, Strategies from Small Business Lawyer and Trademar, Contracts, Corporations and LLC'S What Business Owners Should, What are Trademarks

Business Resources

Posted by Michelle L. DelMar, Esq. Jan 19, 2016 1:11:38 PM

Business Resources

Knowledge + Informed Decisions + Proper Implementation = Business Success
Federal Trade Commission Office of Competition

Tags: Strategies from Small Business Lawyer and Trademar, Contracts, Corporations and LLC'S What Business Owners Should, What are Trademarks

Registering your business. What permits or licenses apply?

Posted by Michelle L. DelMar, Esq. Jan 19, 2016 1:03:20 PM

Registering your business. What permits or licenses apply?

    Non-compliance with certificate and permitting laws and regulations can be costly, monetarily and through exposure to liability.  Attorney Grenier can assist you in determining which business certificates, permits and/or licenses will be necessary to operate your business and assist you in the legal aspects of applying for and obtaining the same, so that you can focus on your business matters that need to addressed.
Want to discuss your business issues?

Tags: Strategies from Small Business Lawyer and Trademar, Contracts, Corporations and LLC'S What Business Owners Should, What are Trademarks

Private School Law

Posted by Michelle L. DelMar, Esq. Jan 19, 2016 12:56:40 PM

Private School Law

In addition to the issues presented on the New Business Checklists, private schools should consider additional legal issues that relate to their business, for example:

Tags: Private School Law, Strategies from Small Business Lawyer and Trademar, Contracts, Corporations and LLC'S What Business Owners Should, What are Trademarks

Discuss Your Business Goals and Issues With A Small Business Lawyer

Posted by Michelle L. DelMar, Esq. Jan 19, 2016 12:52:45 PM

Discuss your business goals and issues with a Small Business Lawyer and Trademark Attorney.

 

100% Business Law . . . 100% of the Time.

Taking a Dispute-Avoidance approach,
i.e., taking preventative measures now to avoid disputes later.

 

How can I obtain information for Starting a Small Business? Information for Small Businesses

How Can I Learn about Business Agreements? Understanding Business Agreements

How can I obtain a Checklist for My Small Business Issue? Small Business Checklists

Where can I find a articles related to Small Business Law? Go to "Ask a Small Business Lawyer Blog"

 

Click here to Schedule a Consultation with Michelle Grenier, Small Business Lawyer and Trademark Attorney.

Tags: Strategies from Small Business Lawyer and Trademar, Contracts, Corporations and LLC'S What Business Owners Should, What are Trademarks

Non Compete Agreement Checklist

Posted by Michelle L. DelMar, Esq. Jan 19, 2016 12:47:57 PM

Non Compete Agreement Checklist

Non compete agreements are often a part of (or clause within) a broader agreement, e.g. an independent contractor agreement, employment agreement, confidentiality agreement distributorship agreement, etc.  The following is a helpful non-exclusive checklist for a non-compete clause.

  • Describe the consideration provided (e.g., salary, payment, disclosure, etc.). 
  • Describe restrictive time period (must be reasonable and enforceable).
  • Describe geographical scope of restriction. 
  • Describe scope of restricted activities, e.g.  "employee will not  . . . 

          1. contact or solicit customers                      

          2. discourage customers

          3. participate in, restricted activities, e.g.  engage in business that competes, etc.

  • Require attorneys fees and cost be paid in event of breach of
    Non Compete Agreement. 
  • Provide for injunctive remedy, in addition to other remedies in event of breach of Non Compete Contract.

    Note, non-circumvention provisions may also be appropriate in certain circumstances.

Related Info and Checklists:

Non-Compete Agreement

Confidentiality Agreement

Distributor Agreement

Contact Experienced Non-Compete Lawyer, Michelle DelMar, for a consultation.

Tags: Non Compete Agreement Checklist, Strategies from Small Business Lawyer and Trademar, Contracts, Corporations and LLC'S What Business Owners Should, What are Trademarks

Literary Services Agreement Checklist

Posted by Michelle L. DelMar, Esq. Jan 19, 2016 12:32:20 PM

Literary Services Agreement Checklist

     Use this checklist as a tool to facilitate discussion concerning literary services, including, writing and/or ghostwriting.

Tags: Publishing Agreement Checklist, Strategies from Small Business Lawyer and Trademar, Contracts, Corporations and LLC'S What Business Owners Should, What are Trademarks

What is a Letter of Credit?

Posted by Michelle L. DelMar, Esq. Jan 19, 2016 11:33:32 AM

What is a Letter of Credit?

Use of Letters of Credit, reduce the exposure to risk inherent in international business transactions, when certain methods of payment are implemented.

The Letter of Credit is the means by which parties may reduce risk in international transactions.  With a Letter of Credit a seller of goods assures that the expected payment will be received, most typically in international business transactions.  In practice, it has been standardized by a universally accepted set of rules, namely, the Uniform Customs and Practice for Documentary Credit, issued by the International Chamber of Commerce.

In international business transactions, the methods of payment used payment in advance, on open account, or C.O.D.  C.O.D. is accomplished generally, by payment against collection documents, that is, the seller will forward the customary shipping documents through the seller's bank to the buyer's domestic bank, including a draft drawn on the buyer for collection.  Then draft is honored and paid or, if appropriate, accepted, the buyer will obtain delivery of the documents, which entitle the buyer to delivery of the goods.

If cash is paid to seller in advance, the buyer's risk includes defective performance or non-performance.  With a C.O.D. or collection transaction, the documents are presented after the goods have been shipped and often after arrival at the destination port. Thus, if the draft is not honored, the risk is that the buyer may not pay for the manufacturing/fabrication and shipping.  The seller bears the maximum risk of non-payment, in a sale on open account.

 What is a Standby Letter of Credit?

Similar to commercial Letters of Credit standby letters of credit are documentary, that is, collection is achieved through the presentation of one or more documents, such as a draft or other demand.  A standby letter of credit is applied in an unlimited variety of transactions, including sale of goods and its purpose is to assure a party to a contract that the other party will perform its obligations.  The standby letter of credit is similar to a performance guarantee in function.

What is the typical structure of the Letter of Credit transaction?

Typically, in a sale of goods, the Letter of Credit transaction is made up of three contracts, as follows:

(1)       Buyer-Seller Contract. The buyer and seller contract for the purchase and sale of the goods requiring payment through a documentary credit.

(2)       Buyer-Bank Contract.  The buyer ("account party") applies for a letter of credit, instructing the buyer's bank ("issuer") to open the credit for the benefit of the seller based upon the application terms.

(3)       Advising Bank-Seller.  The issuing bank issues the letter of credit and forwards it to an advising bank within the country of the seller. The advising bank, advises the seller of the opening of the credit in seller's favor.

What information is contained in a Letter of Credit?

Generally and most often, a letter of credit contains the following:

(1)       The names of the Parties (including the advising bank).

(2)       The credit amount.

(3)       Expiration Date.

(4)       The undertaking of the issuer to pay upon presentation of the draft and specified documents and generally, whether payable on presentation ("a sight draft") or payable at a time after presentation ("a time" or "issuance draft").

(5)       Merchandise description; whether partial shipments and transshipments will be permitted.

(6)       All special conditions and/or instructions.

Want to discuss your business issue?

Click here to schedule a Consultation


Tags: Strategies from Small Business Lawyer and Trademar, Contracts, Corporations and LLC'S What Business Owners Should, What is a Letter of Credit?, What are Trademarks